Linux Video Editing Tutorial using Kdenlive

This tutorial covers how to do video editing on linux using a software program called kdenlive. We cover the following topics: * moving video data from camer…

25 Thoughts on “Linux Video Editing Tutorial using Kdenlive

  1. Santosh Mitra on April 14, 2013 at 6:47 am said:

    This is the most complete yet simple kdenlive 1-o-1 guide I found on Youtube. Every linux newbie should watch this if video editing is the requirement ;).

    Thank you Dean :)

  2. Wayne Law on April 14, 2013 at 7:36 am said:

    Thanks Dean! I do have a external USB 3.0 drive that would be quicker…I will look into where to get the OS you mentioned here. Thanks again for taking time to answer my question…much appreciation

  3. Dean Montgomery on April 14, 2013 at 8:11 am said:

    I don’t think kdenlive runs on Windows. However you may be able to boot a live usb Linux distro like Ubuntu and then install kdenlive package on the USB stick in order to test it out. Running off a USB is usually pretty slow due to slow read/write nature of USB.

  4. Wayne Law on April 14, 2013 at 8:43 am said:

    So I am not a Linux user but does this work in the windows OS as well?

  5. williamkenobi on April 14, 2013 at 9:19 am said:

    Thank you man, you’re the only one who helps me with this!

  6. Dean Montgomery on April 14, 2013 at 10:17 am said:

    kdenlive=>Render=>Destination == DVD

    Check: “Open Dvd wizard after rendering”

  7. Paolo Cusinu on April 14, 2013 at 10:41 am said:

    well… I was envisioning the opposite way… DVD is the target…

    Thank you for your patience…

    paolo

  8. Dean Montgomery on April 14, 2013 at 10:41 am said:

    I’m not sure if kdenlive will import dvd movies. However you can use Handbrake to convert the dvd to a video file then import it into kdenlive.

  9. Paolo Cusinu on April 14, 2013 at 10:44 am said:

    all right… that makes sense… what if I have to mess with educational DVDs? I mean for television…

  10. Dean Montgomery on April 14, 2013 at 10:58 am said:

    When the school buys new cameras I usually suggest changing the defauts from 1080p down to 720p. Because: most videos end up on web/youtube/moodle which rarely uses 1080p. At 720p the file sizes are smaller and they are much easier/faster to work with in the editing software.

  11. Paolo Cusinu on April 14, 2013 at 11:17 am said:

    well I tried a miniDV camera… the video is an absolute crap… but the audio is like REAL :)

    so I thought you could maybe help… I mean: I want to double check the result before purchasing a new camera… just to avoid any problem… so I want the very same camera you are using.

    Thank you anyway.

  12. Dean Montgomery on April 14, 2013 at 12:16 pm said:

    I usually just use the cameras that are at the school. Most of them just work plug-n-play. I’ve noticed if the video is too big (1080p) and the computer is too slow you may need to use “File”=>”Transcode Clips” to optimize the clips before importing them into your project. I’m not an expert on cameras however you can always google for: inexpensive video camera reviews

  13. Paolo Cusinu on April 14, 2013 at 1:15 pm said:

    well I forgot I need a CHEAP CAMERA… ciao

  14. Paolo Cusinu on April 14, 2013 at 1:37 pm said:

    Hi man… nice job… can you tell me the name of a good camera usable with linux with nice video and BETTER audio quality for some educational staff I am working on. thanks and good luck

  15. fleabites on April 14, 2013 at 1:58 pm said:

    This is gold! Perfect tutorial to get a video newbie like me on track. Thank you very much!

  16. MEXICAPARADISE on April 14, 2013 at 2:15 pm said:

    chido!

  17. Dean Montgomery on April 14, 2013 at 3:09 pm said:

    Which version of Linux are you running? You may need to install/update the codec packages on your system. In kdenlive go to Settings=>Run Config Wizard – on the 2nd page there are two tabs with a list of Installed Modules & Available Codecs.

    Another thing to try would be to use File=>Transcode Clips on your original clips – before you add them to the project. Test with a short clip so you don’t waste too much time waiting.

  18. EggAndSkittleDontGo on April 14, 2013 at 3:38 pm said:

    i’ve tried everything to render this but it only renders a black screen, help?

  19. nortaox on April 14, 2013 at 3:57 pm said:

    Thanks Dean, I was unaware of Ubuntu Studio. I just went through the tour section on their website, I will definitely install it.

  20. Dean Montgomery on April 14, 2013 at 4:25 pm said:

    Theme is the default for Ubuntu Studio which is a great distro for multimedia. Just google for: Ubuntu Studio.

  21. nortaox on April 14, 2013 at 5:19 pm said:

    I like your Ubuntu Theme, what is it?

  22. apothecary21c on April 14, 2013 at 5:19 pm said:

    I started using Kdenlive for the first time last night, because Openshot hates my new AMD Vision powered laptop. Very helpful video. Thanks!

  23. Επιχειρηση Ψυχαγωγια on April 14, 2013 at 6:10 pm said:

    Τhat was great thanks man!
    and i thought this program was worthless!

  24. Cláudio Sampaio on April 14, 2013 at 6:38 pm said:

    You found them funny? I thought they were frightening! But, alas, excellent tutorial, and at least the {funny|frightening} faces have a lot of mnemonic value.

  25. Dean Montgomery on April 14, 2013 at 7:23 pm said:

    You need to use PNG format and ensure the background is transparent. You can find tutorials on google/youtube by searching for: gimp transparent background png

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